ENFP (Myers Briggs and Fictional Characters)

Today we’re talking about ENFPs! According to the 16 Personalities website:

ENFPs are fiercely independent, and much more than stability and security, they crave creativity and freedom.

Often described as one of the most enthusiastic and lovable types, so whether you are an ENFP or are friends with one, I thought it’d be interesting to take a look at some fictional ENFP examples!

Aang from Avatar: The Last Airbender

Aang.pngOne of my favourite characters from one of my favourite cartoon series, Aang personifies the Campainer personality type!

Willy Wonka from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Roald Dahl)

Willy Wonka.jpgI’ve always had mixed feelings about Willy Wonka – is he not a bit creepy? Anyway, there it is.

Nymphadora Tonks from the Harry Potter series (JK Rowling)

Tonks.jpgTonks!

Alaska from Looking for Alaska (John Green)

AlaskaAlaska is wild, a free-spirit, and deeply feeling. ENFPs tend to be portrayed as a lot happier, so it’s interesting to see another side to the type.

Bruno from The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas (John Boyne)

Bruno (striped pyjamas).jpgI always think kids are harder to type, so this one’s a maybe! But I do think he’s creative and outgoing enough to be plausible.

Peeta Mellark from The Hunger Games trilogy (Suzanne Collins)

Peeta_MellarkI had to choose a picture from earlier on in the series – everything else was too sad ūüė•

So, if you’re an ENFP, do you relate to any of these characters? Are there any you think might be mis-typed?

Let me know if there are any other personality types you’d like to see a post on!

Thanks for reading, and have a lovely day!

Dani

Advertisements

INTJ (Myers Briggs and Fictional Characters)

Happy Friday! A few days ago, I promised Kate of The Owl and the Reader¬†a little post about what an INTJ might look like in the fictional world, so…here is that post!

I find Myers Briggs so interesting – so if you want to find out about other personality types, feel free to request! I’ve also done posts about INFP, ISFP¬†and ENTJ.

Anyways, Kate is an INTJ Рthis means that she favours Introversion, iNtuition, Thinking, and Judging. I referred to my favourite Myers Briggs website (it has pictures) to see what that could mean in practice:

People with the INTJ personality type are imaginative yet decisive, ambitious yet private, amazingly curious, but they do not squander their energy.

I had a browse through this website to find some fictional characters that might share the INTJ personality type, and there was such an interesting mix that I put together a few more examples than usual!

Fitzwilliam Darcy from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Mr Darcy

Okay, so Darcy isn’t a saint, but he is definitely good at heart. I think this is one to be happy about!

Gandalf and Saruman from The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkein

Gandalf and Saruman

So we have two examples of people at opposite ends of the good/evil spectrum. I’d take this as confirmation that you can choose your own path…or something.

Professor Moriarty from Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Moriarty

Okay, so this is a little scary.

Severus Snape from Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

Severus_Snape

Again, lovely at heart.

Amy Dunne from Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Amy Dunne

Yep. Also a little bit terrifying. I’m just going to leave this here and back away…

Thomas from the Maze Runner by James Dashner

Thomas (MR).jpg

This is a really interesting one! I would never have thought of Thomas myself, but now someone else says it, I can see it!

Jean Valjean from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo

kinopoisk.ru

I thought this was a great one to end on! There’s a really vast range of characters under this personality type, but I think Valjean is my favourite. He’s the definition of an overcomer!

That’s all from me – but are there any other INTJ characters you’d add to the list?

Thank you for reading, and have a lovely day!

~Dani

ISFP (Myers Briggs and Fictional Characters)

A while ago there was a little craze for taking Myers Briggs personality test (I like this one) and working out which fictional characters have the same type as you. I’m INFP, so you can read mine here, but today I wanted to talk a bit about ISFPs!

My little sister is an ISFP, which means she favours Introversion, Sensing, Feeling, and Percieving. It’s a really interesting personality type.

ISFPs live in a colorful, sensual world, inspired by connections with people and ideas. ISFP personalities take joy in reinterpreting these connections, reinventing and experimenting with both themselves and new perspectives. No other type explores and experiments in this way more. This creates a sense of spontaneity, making ISFPs seem unpredictable, even to their close friends and loved ones

Source

I had a look through this website to see which literary characters might share her type, and I wasn’t disappointed!

Edmund Pevensie from The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

Edmund Pevensie

When I took my test, I got Lucy! I’m feeling very secure in our sibling-ness right now.

Buttercup from The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Buttercup (TPB)

Of all the characters in The Princess Bride, I think Buttercup has to be one of the nicest one to be matched with. Great job!

Cinna from the Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Cinna

While Cinna’s not the biggest character in The Hunger Games, he plays a really pivotal part in the story, and he is genuinely quite a wonderful person. I think this is one to be happy about!

Harry Potter from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter

This probably means that you are going to be famous, change the world, and become the face of an international franchise. Oh, and you should watch out for bald, noseless men.

Legolas Greenleaf from The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkein

Legolas

To be honest, this is the match I can understand the most for my sister. I know long, flowing locks, great height and proficiency for drawing blood aren’t really to do with personality type, but…

Liesel Meminger from The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Leisel Meminger

The Book Thief is one of my all-time favourites, so obviously I’m thrilled to be related to a Liesel!

Soos Ramirez from Gravity Falls

soos ramirez.png

I felt I would be failing my duty as a sister if I only found you lovely matches.¬†So you’re Soos Ramirez, you’re welcome.

So, how about you? What’s your Myers Briggs type, and which fictional characters match up with you?

Thanks for reading, and have a lovely day!

~Dani

Month in Books: November 2014

It’s December! Where has the year gone?

Anyway, I’m putting my excitement for Christmas on hold just long enough to write up my November wrap-up – here it is!

The Body – Stephen King – 4 stars¬†This is a really interesting autobiography; it centres around one main event in King’s childhood, and builds up everything around it. With emphasis on writing techniques and routes, this book makes for a really interesting read.

Harry Potter y la Piedra Filosofal – J.K. Rowling – 5 stars¬†I thought it was time to read a whole novel in Spanish, and Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone seemed like a good place to start! I’d forgotten how much fun this book was.

Northern Lights – Philip Pullman – 4 stars¬†My second re-read of the month! I love this story and setting so much, and the protagonist, Lyra, is just fantastic. I’m glad I read this one, but I don’t plan to go back to the other two; I felt like the shift into a second world and the concentrated antitheism let the series down for me.

The Bloody Chamber – Angela Carter – 4 stars¬†This is actually one of my set texts for later on in my course, so I’ll probably have to go back to it again next year. It’s a collection of Ms. Carter’s takes on popular fairy tales and folklore, all beautifully written and most pretty dark. It’s really interesting to see the famous stories re-interpreted, and to understand what someone else views as the important components of the classic tales.

How to Train Your Dragon – Cressida Cowell – 4 stars¬†I reviewed this here! I really enjoyed this little children’s book: set in the dark ages, vikings and dragons wrestle for superiority in a series of comedic and touching events. Not to be compared with the movie.

The Red Necklace – Sally Gardner – 4 stars¬†I must have been feeling nostalgic this month, because this is my third re-read of a book I loved when I was younger. This is set in Revolution-era France, and is just fantastic. Scary, romantic and a little bit weird, I absolutely recommend this. Also the audiobook is read by Tom Hiddleston, so…

The Pursuit of God – A.W. Tozer – 5 stars¬†This was my first time reading a proper theological book, and I really loved this one! It was both practical and inspiring, and really well written. I’ll be picking this one up again!

The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness – Timothy Keller – 5 stars¬†This is a tiny little book, but it’s full of really solid advice. Insecurity is loud and confidence is knowing you’re loved as-is. Highly recommended read!

The Problem of Pain РC.S. Lewis Р5 stars  I read more Christian non-fiction this month than I have in my LIFE, but I really enjoyed it! This one is more in the realms of apologetics: why does suffering happen, and how can an all-loving God condone it? Eloquently presented and thoroughly explored, this book taught me that C.S. Lewis is well-respected and over-quoted for a reason.

The DUFF: Designated Ugly Fat Friend – Kody Keplinger – 4 stars¬†I heard a movie adaptation was on its way, so I decided to jump on the bandwagon and pick up the e-book. I read it in one sitting. I think I’d call it a YA romance, but it did feel like it was considering some much more profound issues. I didn’t agree with everything implied, or particularly appreciate the emotional sparsity, but on the whole the book kept me hooked and I managed to get really invested in the characters. A fun, quick read.

Divine Healing: A Scriptural Approach to Sickness, Faith and Healing – Andrew Murray – 4 stars¬†I was a bit unsure about this book at first: the first few chapters felt a bit repetitive and I wondered whether the great points Mr. Murray was putting across actually needed to be a whole book. About halfway through I felt a shift, and there was suddenly a lot more fresh and diverse material to get my teeth into. Because the subject of this book is something I haven’t read a lot about, I really appreciated the frequent Bible references, so I could go and look up evidence for myself. It’s important not to accept everything you read, even if it is a ‘Christian’ book! I did walk away feeling inspired and empowered, so I’d recommend this!

Eleven books! I’m quite pleased with that, considering I’ve been flooded with passages to read for my course. Have you read any of the books on the list? What was your favourite read of November?

Thanks for reading, and have a lovely day!

~Dani

Insults: A Short Guide (From Literary Characters)

Do you ever need the perfect, witty, finger-snapping conversation-ender at short notice? Look no further, there are already some pretty fantastic one-liners out there!¬†Here are a few of my favourite literary quips…but, like, be nice to people.

If your brains were dynamite there wouldn’t be enough to blow your hat off.

– Kurt Vonnegut, Timequake

I desire that we be better strangers.

РWilliam Shakespeare, As You Like It

She is nuttier than squirrel poo.

РJ.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

I never saw anybody take so long to dress, and with such little result.

РOscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

¬†If looks could kill, you’d soon find out that yours couldn’t.

РIris Owens, After Claude

What are your favourite ‘book burns’?

Thanks for reading, and have a lovely day!

~Dani

Misleading Plot Blurbs: Answers

On Sunday, I posted a little list of famous books summarised misleadingly,¬† and asked you to guess what I was describing. You got a good few! Anyway, this is the follow-up post where I tell you what the solutions really were. If you haven’t seen the original yet, pop over before continuing!

Blurb: An elderly man kidnaps a small child from her bed.
Answer: The BFG by Roald Dahl

Blurb: An unpleasant writer follows two teenagers half-way across the globe.
Answer: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Blurb: Some friends team up to murder a hoarder.
Answer: The Hobbit by JRR Tolkein

Blurb: A pyromaniac suffering from depression and an excellent hairstyle finds her wings.
Answer: Mockingjay (The Hunger Games Trilogy) by Suzanne Collins

Blurb: A deranged and racist gentleman hunts and attempts to kill a large cut of meat.
Answer: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Blurb: A cat lover goes on an extended fishing trip.
Answer: Life of Pi by Yann Martel

Blurb: A sweet-toothed atheist starts a scandal.
Answer: Chocolat by Joanne Harris

Blurb: An abused child is pursued by a giant taken from his family.
Answer: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by JK Rowling

Blurb: A fish gets hungry for no apparent reason.
Answer: Jaws by Peter Benchley

Blurb: Five Englishmen (give or take a Hungarian)  hunt down an ambitious immigrant.
Answer: Dracula by Bram Stoker

How many did you guess right?

Thanks for reading, and have a lovely day!

~Dani